3/20/16 CSCC SCCA CAM-C Writeup

This weekend we ran with the California Sports Car Club region at El Toro MCAS in Irvine, CA. This was a new venue for us and we loved it. Located a mere 25 minutes from SRW Headquarters, the commute was easy, the weather was great, and the course was awesome! Getting to the track was a little confusing, but luckily we followed in a few other competitors. We worked in the first group and worked third, allowing for a much shorter day than our previous SDR adventures.

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The course itself is run on the retired airfield, with grid and paddock being setup on the adjoining runways. CSCC has large banners and abundant signage; making registration, tech, and getting into grid a clear and simple process. We pre-registered online, which gave us a look at the entry list beforehand. 9 cars were on the list, with one more being added day-of. The final entry list, not counting the Stealth Bomber, was as follows:

  • 1999 Roush Mustang
  • 2010 Camaro
  • 2006 Mustang GT
  • 2008 Mustang Bullitt
  • 1990 Mustang
  • 2015 Camaro
  • 2001 Roush Mustang
  • 2003 Mustang GT
  • 2012 Mustang GT

The most exciting entrant was the 1999 Roush Mustang, BTM-Autosport‘s Modzilla. Fresh out of the garage in CAM-C configuration, this beast came ready to fight with super-wide Jongbloed Racing wheels and fresh BFGoodrich g-Force Rival-S tires.

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The field was large and competition was hot. The course was Nationals-level good, with a fantastic choose-your-line corner and a lot of learning experiences. An exciting moment occurred when a C6 Corvette went off-course and performed some involuntary body work via wooden directional marker. In CAM-C, Modzilla stole first with a blazing 66.876, the 2010 Camaro grabbed second with a 68.902, and the Stealth Bomber rounded out the podium with a 69.941. The rest of the field couldn’t manage to break into the 60’s with times ranging between 71.403 and 82.408. The entire results list can be found here. Did we mention CSCC features live scoring? The tech used by this region was a great benefit, something sorely lacking at SDR.

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We used this event to dial-in our tire pressure game and test some experimental aero work. Results were great and taught us a lot about car setup. Overall the experience was great and we can’t wait to return to El Toro with CSCC.

More Audrey Hepburn, Less Jayne Mansfield.

We recently came across a great article at Petrolicious, profiling Dorian Valenzuela and his shop, DV Mechanics. The goal of the shop is to resto-mod period Alfa Romeos, allowing the cars to “go to Joshua Tree and blast around for the weekend”, among other things. If this starts to ring of Singer Vehicle Design, DV is an alumni of that company. But the goal isn’t high-dollar, its high-function, which is right up our alley. A few quotes that really stuck out as far as inspiration goes:

I really got a kick out of was buying the raw materials, going to the machine shop after hours and making my own bushings or taking a little bit of weight out of a piece of hardware. That was kinda my thing, doing “plus one” type rebuilds on various components of the car.

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I just liked that they carried on the same basic aesthetic but improved everything underneath.

For me it is an organic process with a lot of trial and error, kinda like watching your girlfriend pick out an outfit, I can’t wait [laughs].

I also want to build car that someone will not be afraid to use the shit out of.

The interior’s going to be a little bit more minimal, but equally beautiful I think. The exterior is going to appear as if it was a factory build. It’s not going to scream out at you for attention.

I take on routine jobs to fund my skunkworks projects.

You have to find somebody who really understands what you’re doing and realizes that it’s basically an art project for the first year and then it can become a money thing.

We recommend reading and viewing the whole article, as there are a lot of great tidbits and shots of various projects at DV Mechanics. Also, don’t miss the video!

S197 Mustang Bumper Removal

We’ve seen a video or two on the S197 bumper removal process, but after tackling the job ourselves, we found a written step-by-step was needed to cover everything. Lets gather the tools.

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  • Medium Flathead Screwdriver
  • 3/8″ Ratchet
  • 3/8″ Long Extension, Wobble
  • 3/8″ 10mm Socket
  • 1/4″ Driver
  • 1/4″ 7/32″ Socket (optional)
  • 5/16″ Hex Driver (optional)
  • Short Phillips Screwdriver (We use the thumb drive in our Chapman 5503 Screwdriver Kit)
  • Matador Surface

We started by opening the hood, then popping out the six pop rivets on the upper radiator cover with our flathead screwdriver, then removing the cover.

Next, we unbolted the two 10mm bolts holding the upper bumper cover on, then lifted each corner over the retention tabs.

Then we moved to the wheel wells. The exact same process works for both driver and passenger sides. We removed the three Phillips screws and the pop clip, which required a half-turn to disengage. It can then be removed by hand. Then the lower portion of the fender liner can be pulled over the lip of the bumper. The liner hides two 10mm bolts holding the bumper to the fender, which are best removed with the 3/8″ wobble extension and ratchet. Note that the liner has a cutout to allow for just the lower portion to pivot away from the fender.

We then went under the front bumper, where in our case five 7/32″ screws and two Phillips screws held the lower splash shield to the bumper and the radiator cross member. We suspect the 7/32″ screws were added by the previous owner, as they did not appear OEM. We also loosened the hose clamps around our brake duct hoses with the 5/16″ driver, sliding the hoses off our fiberglass brake ducts.

At this point the bumper was ready to remove. We pulled down on the corners of the bumper, clearing the two studs by each of the wheels, then pulled the bumper upwards and out, from the center, and set it aside.

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Installation is – wait for it – reverse of removal! We performed this work to facilitate painting the AC condenser flat black and touching up our front tow hook, which you can find in our February 2016 Bomber update. We also performed some top secret aero work, which we cannot reveal until testing is complete, so stay tuned!